Thursday, January 8, 2009


I've never been a patient person. The winter months are long and trying so I work with as vibrant colors the palette offers to chase away the winter doldrums. Spring can't come early enough for me so I paint the garden beauties with the faith that color will some day soon greet me OUTSIDE my studio doors!

7 comments:

RomanticRoses@DorisJoa said...

Oh Mary, this is so beautiful. Love your intense use of colours and the glowing effect. Fantastic work. Which size is it?

Mary Jansen said...

Hi Doris! Thanks for stopping by, (wish I could offer tea and cookies...maybe future internet will have that option...). This is one of a series of florals I am painting. The size is medium/small, 9"x5". I used quin rose, (DS) as a primary pink and shadowed it with F.Ultramarine. The vibrant pinks are opera, (a rather violent color I think...but gets the point across!). Greens consist of sap green mixed wtih a little of everything, including Payne's Grey. P.G. I think is a misunderstood color. Artists say they don't want to resort to using it for shadows but they forget that working it in with other colors creates wonderfully rich, dark blacks and greens! Anyway...more than you want to know, I'm sure! Happy painting rose gal!

RomanticRoses@DorisJoa said...

Thanks for sharing the colours Mary.
I too think different about Paynes Gray and also Ivory Black. Mixed with other colours give so dark rich muted colours.
I am looking forward to see your next floral!!!

RomanticRoses@DorisJoa said...

Hi Mary, I am again.
Just wanted to let you know that I got your comment on my blog. Thank you.
I must approve the comment before you will see it.

mollie jones said...

Hi Mary (and Doris). Just happened to have a little time and glad I checked your site. Mary, haven't check the blog this morning but hope you are going to post this. It's beautiful. Funny thing about colors...some really accomplished artists have really negative perimeters on using colors. There is a really famous guy (won't mention) who refuses Sap green and I just love what you can do with it. Am almost certain that Doris uses it with some of her rose leaves. I sorta shy away from opera but it really looks good on these beauties.

Mary Jansen said...

Hi Mollie! Thanks for stopping in! I was thinking I'd post this for the February challenge...which is why I haven't put it up on the Colony yet. Of course by then though...I'll think it too stale to post. I'll be working on another floral soon...one with lots of yellows in it. The bright colors are cheering me up in this wintery world I presently live in, (and yes...I sometimes even have to resort to "Opera" to lift my spirits...but only in very small quantities...pizzow!)
I'm a lover of sap green too. It is so well mannered...not like those other greens made up of dyes! I like especially how it blends so nicely with raw sienna, (I think it actually has r.s. in it...which makes it especially compatible!). And one can mix it with blues and reds and get such lovely earthy tones. Whoever says he doesn't like it must not really understand it's nature, (he should be locked in a room with paper, brushes and only ONE tube of sap green...and not let out until he comes to appreciate the color! Ha!) Ah...my poor snow-ridden mind...! Spring will come some day! It will be here if I have to paint it here myself!!!

Mona said...

This is gorgeous Mary!

P.S. I saw your conversation on sap green. I am a lover of sap green too, however it was only after pulling out some illustrations I did many years ago that I realized this color does not have the best permanence. It faded for me, even tucked away in a map case file. With watercolor I've reluctantly switched to Bamboo green (3 stars in W & N) that I mix with oranges and siennas to approximate the sap.